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Octoprint, 2nd pass.

GH
Gene Heskett
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 4:28 PM

Greetings all;

I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It
is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier.

There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written
mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on
x86_64stuff too.

I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow
night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already.

I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be
improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that
marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most
glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition
of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds
and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with
megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve.  Some of the gcode generated
by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation"
certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of
code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the
coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of
slice3d, appear to be the main contenders.  But I'd like to try
octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have.

So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to
install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64
AppImage on their site.

Thank you all.

Take care, stay safe and well.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable.

Greetings all; I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier. There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on x86_64stuff too. I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already. I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve. Some of the gcode generated by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation" certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of slice3d, appear to be the main contenders. But I'd like to try octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have. So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64 AppImage on their site. Thank you all. Take care, stay safe and well. Cheers, Gene Heskett -- "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author) If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable. - Louis D. Brandeis Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>
MA
Mike Aubury
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 5:18 PM

I've seen videos featuring arcwelder as a cura post processor to convert
those short straight sections back to curves..

That significantly reduces the size and improves the resultant prints..

On Tue, 6 Apr 2021, 17:28 Gene Heskett, gheskett@shentel.net wrote:

Greetings all;

I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It
is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier.

There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written
mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on
x86_64stuff too.

I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow
night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already.

I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be
improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that
marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most
glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition
of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds
and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with
megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve.  Some of the gcode generated
by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation"
certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of
code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the
coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of
slice3d, appear to be the main contenders.  But I'd like to try
octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have.

So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to
install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64
AppImage on their site.

Thank you all.

Take care, stay safe and well.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable.


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org

I've seen videos featuring arcwelder as a cura post processor to convert those short straight sections back to curves.. That significantly reduces the size and improves the resultant prints.. On Tue, 6 Apr 2021, 17:28 Gene Heskett, <gheskett@shentel.net> wrote: > Greetings all; > > I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It > is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier. > > There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written > mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on > x86_64stuff too. > > I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow > night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already. > > I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be > improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that > marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most > glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition > of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds > and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with > megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve. Some of the gcode generated > by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation" > certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of > code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the > coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of > slice3d, appear to be the main contenders. But I'd like to try > octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have. > > So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to > install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64 > AppImage on their site. > > Thank you all. > > Take care, stay safe and well. > > Cheers, Gene Heskett > -- > "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: > soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." > -Ed Howdershelt (Author) > If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable. > - Louis D. Brandeis > Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene> > _______________________________________________ > OpenSCAD mailing list > To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org >
RW
Ron Wheeler
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 5:42 PM

Your message seems a bit muddled.
Why do you talk about a slicer (Cura)? Any slicer will do.

Octoprint just feeds existing g-Code to the printer at the rate that the
printer needs it.

https://community.octoprint.org/docs?search=linux&topic=25435 lists a
large number of supported OS and starts with
"OctoPrint is platform agnostic and can run basically anywhere where
Python 2.7 or 3.7+ is available.
It officially supports Linux, Windows, MacOS X and FreeBSD and is
actively tested on Linux and Windows."

What OS do you want to run on your Dell?
Do you want to do anything else on the Dell at the same time?

https://snapcraft.io/install/octoprint-pfs/rhel  to install on a machine
running Red Hat.
https://snapcraft.io/install/octoprint-pfs/centos for Centos
I am sure that most other versions of Linux will work.

https://community.octoprint.org/t/setting-up-octoprint-on-windows/383
Octoprint on Windows

Using a 16Gb Dell as a print server is overkill but it will work.

A $25 pi is a cheaper solution and will do the job and take very little
space.

I think that almost any post-2000 PC with a recent OS should work.

On 2021-04-06 12:28 p.m., Gene Heskett wrote:

Greetings all;

I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It
is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier.

There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written
mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on
x86_64stuff too.

I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow
night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already.

I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be
improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that
marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most
glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition
of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds
and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with
megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve.  Some of the gcode generated
by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation"
certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of
code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the
coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of
slice3d, appear to be the main contenders.  But I'd like to try
octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have.

So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to
install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64
AppImage on their site.

Thank you all.

Take care, stay safe and well.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

--
Ron Wheeler
Artifact Software
438-345-3369
rwheeler@artifact-software.com

Your message seems a bit muddled. Why do you talk about a slicer (Cura)? Any slicer will do. Octoprint just feeds existing g-Code to the printer at the rate that the printer needs it. https://community.octoprint.org/docs?search=linux&topic=25435 lists a large number of supported OS and starts with "OctoPrint is platform agnostic and can run basically anywhere where Python 2.7 or 3.7+ is available. It officially supports Linux, Windows, MacOS X and FreeBSD and is actively tested on Linux and Windows." What OS do you want to run on your Dell? Do you want to do anything else on the Dell at the same time? https://snapcraft.io/install/octoprint-pfs/rhel  to install on a machine running Red Hat. https://snapcraft.io/install/octoprint-pfs/centos for Centos I am sure that most other versions of Linux will work. https://community.octoprint.org/t/setting-up-octoprint-on-windows/383 Octoprint on Windows Using a 16Gb Dell as a print server is overkill but it will work. A $25 pi is a cheaper solution and will do the job and take very little space. I think that almost any post-2000 PC with a recent OS should work. On 2021-04-06 12:28 p.m., Gene Heskett wrote: > Greetings all; > > I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It > is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier. > > There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written > mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on > x86_64stuff too. > > I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow > night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already. > > I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be > improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that > marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most > glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition > of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds > and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with > megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve. Some of the gcode generated > by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation" > certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of > code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the > coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of > slice3d, appear to be the main contenders. But I'd like to try > octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have. > > So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to > install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64 > AppImage on their site. > > Thank you all. > > Take care, stay safe and well. > > Cheers, Gene Heskett -- Ron Wheeler Artifact Software 438-345-3369 rwheeler@artifact-software.com
RW
Ray West
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 6:24 PM

Octoprint.org, has the info about the requirements for the pi/whatever,
the forum is helpful, and for a quick answer, they have a discord. The
later versions of Marlin have G2 and G3 https://marlinfw.org/meta/gcode/
but if your printer has the 8 bit controller, it may be difficult to
install it, a) no bootloader, b) not enough room. The older/slower pis
may not be able to communicate fast enough to the controller, which can
lead to artefacts, and they may not be able to run a camera, but using
octoprint you can install the g-code directly to the printer sd card,
and that will print fine. (takes a while to transfer). Anyway, the stl
file has no arcs, so you'd need to start from elsewhere if you want
'curves', or get a slicer that can interpolate straight lines in stl
files in some way, but a bit pointless, since properly set up, data can
be transferred fast enough, storage is cheap, and all 3 axis machines at
the prices we're dealing with, move in straight lines, albeit small
ones, depending on how they are set up, of course ;-) (I wouldn't class
a delta type printer as 3 axis in my argument, since that prints curves
all the time, but fails on straight lines.)

.

On 06/04/2021 17:28, Gene Heskett wrote:

Greetings all;

I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It
is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier.

There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written
mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on
x86_64stuff too.

I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow
night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already.

I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be
improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that
marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most
glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition
of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds
and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with
megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve.  Some of the gcode generated
by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation"
certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of
code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the
coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of
slice3d, appear to be the main contenders.  But I'd like to try
octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have.

So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to
install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64
AppImage on their site.

Thank you all.

Take care, stay safe and well.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

Octoprint.org, has the info about the requirements for the pi/whatever, the forum is helpful, and for a quick answer, they have a discord. The later versions of Marlin have G2 and G3 https://marlinfw.org/meta/gcode/ but if your printer has the 8 bit controller, it may be difficult to install it, a) no bootloader, b) not enough room. The older/slower pis may not be able to communicate fast enough to the controller, which can lead to artefacts, and they may not be able to run a camera, but using octoprint you can install the g-code directly to the printer sd card, and that will print fine. (takes a while to transfer). Anyway, the stl file has no arcs, so you'd need to start from elsewhere if you want 'curves', or get a slicer that can interpolate straight lines in stl files in some way, but a bit pointless, since properly set up, data can be transferred fast enough, storage is cheap, and all 3 axis machines at the prices we're dealing with, move in straight lines, albeit small ones, depending on how they are set up, of course ;-) (I wouldn't class a delta type printer as 3 axis in my argument, since that prints curves all the time, but fails on straight lines.) . On 06/04/2021 17:28, Gene Heskett wrote: > Greetings all; > > I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and linuxcnc. It > is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot easier. > > There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be written > mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it on > x86_64stuff too. > > I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by tomorrow > night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 already. > > I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be > improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that > marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, most > glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the addition > of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle temps, fan speeds > and such. So cura has to deal with curves by simulating them with > megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve. Some of the gcode generated > by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 megabyte marker. That "limitation" > certainly removes ones ability to write gcode because of the volume of > code that has to come from the wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the > coders writing the slicers. cura and octoprint, with a splash of > slice3d, appear to be the main contenders. But I'd like to try > octoprint on one of these x86_64 boxes I already have. > > So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need to > install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64 > AppImage on their site. > > Thank you all. > > Take care, stay safe and well. > > Cheers, Gene Heskett
JW
Jan Wieck
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 7:41 PM

On 4/6/21 1:42 PM, Ron Wheeler via Discuss wrote:

Your message seems a bit muddled.
Why do you talk about a slicer (Cura)? Any slicer will do.

Octoprint just feeds existing g-Code to the printer at the rate that the
printer needs it.

Octoprint does allow for the installation of a slicer and then you can
feed it STL and the like. I have never used that feature since picking
and adjusting the slicer profiles and parameters is a lot easier on the
desktop than through the Octoprint UI.

I am running Octopi on a PI 3B+ for quite a while to drive a Prusa MK3S.
It also controlled an A8 clone before. I feed it G-Code like Ron said
straight from Slic3r-PrusaEdition. No saving files. After configuring
the printer with API keys in Slic3r, there is another button which will
send the G-Code right to the server.

My print server also has an Arducam and is totally capable of handling
that load. The live stream of the camera appears in the Octoprint UI.

A PI 4 would be total overkill for it. Save that one for more demanding
tasks.

What OS do you want to run on your Dell?
Do you want to do anything else on the Dell at the same time?

Gene said elsewhere that he is 100% Linux (just like me). So running
Octoprint on that machine would definitely be an option.

If it is just a spare laptop, then that would actually make sense. I
have an old Lenovo T410 sitting next to my printer in the basement. It
runs CentOS and just has an open browser on the Octoprint UI to easily
control things like preheating for filament change and the like. The
only reason it isn't running Octoprint is that I would need a different
webcam for that setup. That and laziness.

Regards, Jan

--
Jan Wieck
Principle Database Engineer
Amazon Web Services

On 4/6/21 1:42 PM, Ron Wheeler via Discuss wrote: > Your message seems a bit muddled. > Why do you talk about a slicer (Cura)? Any slicer will do. > > Octoprint just feeds existing g-Code to the printer at the rate that the > printer needs it. Octoprint does allow for the installation of a slicer and then you can feed it STL and the like. I have never used that feature since picking and adjusting the slicer profiles and parameters is a lot easier on the desktop than through the Octoprint UI. I am running Octopi on a PI 3B+ for quite a while to drive a Prusa MK3S. It also controlled an A8 clone before. I feed it G-Code like Ron said straight from Slic3r-PrusaEdition. No saving files. After configuring the printer with API keys in Slic3r, there is another button which will send the G-Code right to the server. My print server also has an Arducam and is totally capable of handling that load. The live stream of the camera appears in the Octoprint UI. A PI 4 would be total overkill for it. Save that one for more demanding tasks. > What OS do you want to run on your Dell? > Do you want to do anything else on the Dell at the same time? Gene said elsewhere that he is 100% Linux (just like me). So running Octoprint on that machine would definitely be an option. If it is just a spare laptop, then that would actually make sense. I have an old Lenovo T410 sitting next to my printer in the basement. It runs CentOS and just has an open browser on the Octoprint UI to easily control things like preheating for filament change and the like. The only reason it isn't running Octoprint is that I would need a different webcam for that setup. That and laziness. Regards, Jan -- Jan Wieck Principle Database Engineer Amazon Web Services
RW
Ray West
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 7:52 PM

In the past, I've managed to get around the things i want to round the
corners, ether by differencing a sort of Maltese cross shape for simple
square edges, or importing the scad file into freecad and re-exporting
it, sometimes it works, but not if a minkowski is used in the scad file.
I fond this fillet library - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2461392
but it takes 10minutes and 22secs just to do the quick view of the demo
files, and a further 31minutes 36seconds to render for the stl. I pasted
the original scad code  into the  AngelCad text editor, saved it as an
scad, and then it only took 9.285 seconds to get to the stl. That is a
pretty big improvement in speed., makes things usable. I still need to
see if the filleting does what I want.

In the past, I've managed to get around the things i want to round the corners, ether by differencing a sort of Maltese cross shape for simple square edges, or importing the scad file into freecad and re-exporting it, sometimes it works, but not if a minkowski is used in the scad file. I fond this fillet library - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2461392 but it takes 10minutes and 22secs just to do the quick view of the demo files, and a further 31minutes 36seconds to render for the stl. I pasted the original scad code  into the  AngelCad text editor, saved it as an scad, and then it only took 9.285 seconds to get to the stl. That is a pretty big improvement in speed., makes things usable. I still need to see if the filleting does what I want.
GH
Gene Heskett
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 9:48 PM

On Tuesday 06 April 2021 13:18:55 Mike Aubury wrote:

I've seen videos featuring arcwelder as a cura post processor to
convert those short straight sections back to curves..

That significantly reduces the size and improves the resultant
prints..

Are you saying that the interpretor marlin uses in a stock ender-3,
recognizes g2-g3 circular moves?. That should help.

arcwelder eh? Found it, got it. But it on the wrong machine atm.

I am hoping it will also work with my new printer, which arrived today,
quite a monster, 13" square plate, 17 or 18 inches of overhead, but the
touch screen will get some getting used to, right now its busy printing
an air duct that was on the sd card, looks great so far.  Ignore that
faint thumping sound though.  Now to get back to that machine and see if
I can get another copy of arcwelder for it.

Thank you very much for the hint.

On Tue, 6 Apr 2021, 17:28 Gene Heskett, gheskett@shentel.net wrote:

Greetings all;

I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and
linuxcnc. It is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot
easier.

There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be
written mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it
on x86_64stuff too.

I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by
tomorrow night, already has buster installed so its got some python3
already.

I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be
improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that
marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do,
most glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the
addition of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle
temps, fan speeds and such. So cura has to deal with curves by
simulating them with megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve.
Some of the gcode generated by a 100k .stl can run past the 50
megabyte marker. That "limitation" certainly removes ones ability to
write gcode because of the volume of code that has to come from the
wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the coders writing the slicers.
cura and octoprint, with a splash of slice3d, appear to be the main
contenders.  But I'd like to try octoprint on one of these x86_64
boxes I already have.

So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need
to install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64
AppImage on their site.

Thank you all.

Take care, stay safe and well.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law
respectable. - Louis D. Brandeis
Genes Web page http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org

Cheers, Gene Heskett

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable.

On Tuesday 06 April 2021 13:18:55 Mike Aubury wrote: > I've seen videos featuring arcwelder as a cura post processor to > convert those short straight sections back to curves.. > > That significantly reduces the size and improves the resultant > prints.. Are you saying that the interpretor marlin uses in a stock ender-3, recognizes g2-g3 circular moves?. That should help. arcwelder eh? Found it, got it. But it on the wrong machine atm. I am hoping it will also work with my new printer, which arrived today, quite a monster, 13" square plate, 17 or 18 inches of overhead, but the touch screen will get some getting used to, right now its busy printing an air duct that was on the sd card, looks great so far. Ignore that faint thumping sound though. Now to get back to that machine and see if I can get another copy of arcwelder for it. Thank you very much for the hint. > On Tue, 6 Apr 2021, 17:28 Gene Heskett, <gheskett@shentel.net> wrote: > > Greetings all; > > > > I know the pi, even a 3b, has enough iron to run buster and > > linuxcnc. It is busy but it can do it, but a pi4 does it a whole lot > > easier. > > > > There's a lot of enthusiasm for octoprint. And it appears to be > > written mostly in python3, which means I ought to be able to run it > > on x86_64stuff too. > > > > I've a spare Dell 7010 that will be filled up at 16G of ram by > > tomorrow night, already has buster installed so its got some python3 > > already. > > > > I'm not married to cura, and I thinks its skin rendition could be > > improved, but it does work for some definition of work, given that > > marlins rs274d interpretor is missing 80% of what linuxcnc can do, > > most glaring of course is the missing g2-3 stuff, countered by the > > addition of a pile of m-codes to control such as bed and nozzle > > temps, fan speeds and such. So cura has to deal with curves by > > simulating them with megabytes of .1mm moves to synth the curve. > > Some of the gcode generated by a 100k .stl can run past the 50 > > megabyte marker. That "limitation" certainly removes ones ability to > > write gcode because of the volume of code that has to come from the > > wet ram, and puts us at the mercy of the coders writing the slicers. > > cura and octoprint, with a splash of slice3d, appear to be the main > > contenders. But I'd like to try octoprint on one of these x86_64 > > boxes I already have. > > > > So tell me, if you can, or a url to a good tut., what python3 I need > > to install in order to give it a fair trial? I do not see an x86_64 > > AppImage on their site. > > > > Thank you all. > > > > Take care, stay safe and well. > > > > Cheers, Gene Heskett > > -- > > "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: > > soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." > > -Ed Howdershelt (Author) > > If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law > > respectable. - Louis D. Brandeis > > Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene> > > _______________________________________________ > > OpenSCAD mailing list > > To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org Cheers, Gene Heskett -- "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author) If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable. - Louis D. Brandeis Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>
RW
Ray West
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 10:23 PM

On 06/04/2021 22:48, Gene Heskett wrote:

Are you saying that the interpretor marlin uses in a stock ender-3,

no such thing. Creality have used  used different controller boards,
stepper drivers and firmware. Their firmware, like that of many
manufacturers is maybe a year or two ood. On the lcd display, on
booting, it may show the firmware version. To find out the controller
board type, you will have to open up the case and have a look. It
doesn't matter, since the older 8bit boards worked fine. btw, part
cooling on the ender 3, most air leaks down from the hot end cooling
fan, and the small fan shroud on the part cooling fan is not much use.
so, you can't turn off part cooling, and at full tilt it's not what you
think it is, but it's all fixable. However, I'm not sure if the details
of 3d printing needs to be discussed on this openscad forum, there being
plenty of 3d printing forums and other resources elsewhere.

On 06/04/2021 22:48, Gene Heskett wrote: > Are you saying that the interpretor marlin uses in a stock ender-3, no such thing. Creality have used  used different controller boards, stepper drivers and firmware. Their firmware, like that of many manufacturers is maybe a year or two ood. On the lcd display, on booting, it may show the firmware version. To find out the controller board type, you will have to open up the case and have a look. It doesn't matter, since the older 8bit boards worked fine. btw, part cooling on the ender 3, most air leaks down from the hot end cooling fan, and the small fan shroud on the part cooling fan is not much use. so, you can't turn off part cooling, and at full tilt it's not what you think it is, but it's all fixable. However, I'm not sure if the details of 3d printing needs to be discussed on this openscad forum, there being plenty of 3d printing forums and other resources elsewhere.
RW
Ray West
Tue, Apr 6, 2021 10:29 PM

The 3d filleting works quite well, you can select the top edge, or the
bottom edge, or both. There was an error in the code for the bottom edge
filleting - line 124, or thereabouts needs to be 'translate([0, 0, b - 
1])' I've Not tried the 2d parts.

On 06/04/2021 20:52, Ray West wrote:

In the past, I've managed to get around the things i want to round the
corners, ether by differencing a sort of Maltese cross shape for
simple square edges, or importing the scad file into freecad and
re-exporting it, sometimes it works, but not if a minkowski is used in
the scad file. I fond this fillet library -
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2461392 but it takes 10minutes and
22secs just to do the quick view of the demo files, and a further
31minutes 36seconds to render for the stl. I pasted the original scad
code  into the  AngelCad text editor, saved it as an scad, and then it
only took 9.285 seconds to get to the stl. That is a pretty big
improvement in speed., makes things usable. I still need to see if the
filleting does what I want.


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org

The 3d filleting works quite well, you can select the top edge, or the bottom edge, or both. There was an error in the code for the bottom edge filleting - line 124, or thereabouts needs to be 'translate([0, 0, b -  1])' I've Not tried the 2d parts. On 06/04/2021 20:52, Ray West wrote: > In the past, I've managed to get around the things i want to round the > corners, ether by differencing a sort of Maltese cross shape for > simple square edges, or importing the scad file into freecad and > re-exporting it, sometimes it works, but not if a minkowski is used in > the scad file. I fond this fillet library - > https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2461392 but it takes 10minutes and > 22secs just to do the quick view of the demo files, and a further > 31minutes 36seconds to render for the stl. I pasted the original scad > code  into the  AngelCad text editor, saved it as an scad, and then it > only took 9.285 seconds to get to the stl. That is a pretty big > improvement in speed., makes things usable. I still need to see if the > filleting does what I want. > _______________________________________________ > OpenSCAD mailing list > To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org
GH
Gene Heskett
Wed, Apr 7, 2021 1:58 AM

On Tuesday 06 April 2021 17:48:11 Gene Heskett wrote:

On Tuesday 06 April 2021 13:18:55 Mike Aubury wrote:

I've seen videos featuring arcwelder as a cura post processor to
convert those short straight sections back to curves..

That significantly reduces the size and improves the resultant
prints..

Are you saying that the interpretor marlin uses in a stock ender-3,
recognizes g2-g3 circular moves?. That should help.

arcwelder eh? Found it, got it. But it on the wrong machine atm.

I am hoping it will also work with my new printer, which arrived
today, quite a monster, 13" square plate, 17 or 18 inches of overhead,
but the touch screen will get some getting used to, right now its busy
printing an air duct that was on the sd card, looks great so far.
Ignore that faint thumping sound though.  Now to get back to that
machine and see if I can get another copy of arcwelder for it.

Took a lot of screwing around but I finally got the 2nd copy and it
installed. But cura never heard of this printer. I could probably hack
up something if I could find an editable template and new where to put
it. But I am lacking both.

The printer is an NEWEREAL M-18, and I think the 18 stands for the
maximum print height in inches. It has a textured glass build plate that
isn't readily removable, and the one test print I did was bad, it was
the print cooling air nozzle, built standing on end with about 5mm cut
off the right end as if it was below the plate surface. Since it didn't
waste plastic, but cut it off clean, that had to a happened in whatever
slicer they used.

Thank you very much for the hint.

In the meantime I've another bearing made that fits well, so I'm going to
grind an entry scallop in one side and stuff it full of BB's if I don't
run out of me first.

Later, take care and stay well everybody.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable.

On Tuesday 06 April 2021 17:48:11 Gene Heskett wrote: > On Tuesday 06 April 2021 13:18:55 Mike Aubury wrote: > > I've seen videos featuring arcwelder as a cura post processor to > > convert those short straight sections back to curves.. > > > > That significantly reduces the size and improves the resultant > > prints.. > > Are you saying that the interpretor marlin uses in a stock ender-3, > recognizes g2-g3 circular moves?. That should help. > > arcwelder eh? Found it, got it. But it on the wrong machine atm. > > I am hoping it will also work with my new printer, which arrived > today, quite a monster, 13" square plate, 17 or 18 inches of overhead, > but the touch screen will get some getting used to, right now its busy > printing an air duct that was on the sd card, looks great so far. > Ignore that faint thumping sound though. Now to get back to that > machine and see if I can get another copy of arcwelder for it. > Took a lot of screwing around but I finally got the 2nd copy and it installed. But cura never heard of this printer. I could probably hack up something if I could find an editable template and new where to put it. But I am lacking both. The printer is an NEWEREAL M-18, and I think the 18 stands for the maximum print height in inches. It has a textured glass build plate that isn't readily removable, and the one test print I did was bad, it was the print cooling air nozzle, built standing on end with about 5mm cut off the right end as if it was below the plate surface. Since it didn't waste plastic, but cut it off clean, that had to a happened in whatever slicer they used. > Thank you very much for the hint. In the meantime I've another bearing made that fits well, so I'm going to grind an entry scallop in one side and stuff it full of BB's if I don't run out of me first. Later, take care and stay well everybody. Cheers, Gene Heskett -- "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author) If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable. - Louis D. Brandeis Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>