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file persistence

RW
Ray West
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 1:12 PM

I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of an
item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the stl
file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that may
only be needed once?  Although I tend to keep everything (storage is
cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of the
g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have
changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within openscad
could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated elsewhere.
I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code is limited,
maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file is pretty long.

However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis
milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and
generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at
least for mechanical type objects, not fine art.

I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files
(unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation).

I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of an item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the stl file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that may only be needed once?  Although I tend to keep everything (storage is cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of the g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within openscad could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated elsewhere. I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code is limited, maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file is pretty long. However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at least for mechanical type objects, not fine art. I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files (unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation).
MM
Michael Möller
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 1:52 PM

I keep the OpenSCAD file(s) only. If I did something special with the STL
or Gcode, or even some setup on printer, I make a comment in the OpenSCAD
file.

If the project is a few uncomplicated parts they will reside in the same
file needing some commentjuggle to choose which to render&print. That is
also commented in the file.

But I only keep OpenSCAD files. The point of it all is to reduce the number
of files.

(For large project with many parts I do the opposite: One file per part,
common includes and a txt file for the comment, all in a subdir, zipped
when idle/complete)

Michael, fra mobilen

søn. 12. sep. 2021 15.13 skrev Ray West raywest@raywest.com:

I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of an
item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the stl
file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that may
only be needed once?  Although I tend to keep everything (storage is
cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of the
g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have
changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within openscad
could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated elsewhere.
I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code is limited,
maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file is pretty long.

However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis
milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and
generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at
least for mechanical type objects, not fine art.

I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files
(unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation).


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org

I keep the OpenSCAD file(s) only. If I did something special with the STL or Gcode, or even some setup on printer, I make a comment in the OpenSCAD file. If the project is a few uncomplicated parts they will reside in the same file needing some commentjuggle to choose which to render&print. That is also commented in the file. But I only keep OpenSCAD files. The point of it all is to reduce the number of files. (For large project with many parts I do the opposite: One file per part, common includes and a txt file for the comment, all in a subdir, zipped when idle/complete) Michael, fra mobilen søn. 12. sep. 2021 15.13 skrev Ray West <raywest@raywest.com>: > I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of an > item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the stl > file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that may > only be needed once? Although I tend to keep everything (storage is > cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of the > g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have > changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within openscad > could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated elsewhere. > I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code is limited, > maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file is pretty long. > > However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis > milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and > generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at > least for mechanical type objects, not fine art. > > I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files > (unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation). > _______________________________________________ > OpenSCAD mailing list > To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org >
GH
Gene Heskett
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 2:10 PM

On Sunday 12 September 2021 09:12:55 Ray West wrote:

I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of
an item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the
stl file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that
may only be needed once?  Although I tend to keep everything (storage
is cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of
the g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have
changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within
openscad could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated
elsewhere. I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code
is limited, maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file
is pretty long.

All true, but storage is cheap.

However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis
milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and
generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at
least for mechanical type objects, not fine art.

rs274d (gcode as used by LinuxCNC) has numerous looping constructs, and I
have yet to use a cad program of any kind to write gcode for my 4 cnc'd
metal carvers. I do it by hand. The record here I think is probably a
saw blade shapening thing to tune up dull carbide table saw blades.
About 90 lines, it put 3 days running on Dremels best grinder spinning
one of their diamond disks, and made the sharpest blade I've ever used.
And likely took under 5 thou from the front face only of a worn out 80
tooth carbide ATBF blade. I put it on my table saw where it cut loads of
white ash, cherry, $1500 worth of mahogany, a big pile of butternut,
even some 1/8" alu panel and a small ammount of brass before it put the
first burn mark on some cherry. Several years use. And I may have to do
it again as no one is now making an ATBF blade. If you've ever used one,
you'll never look for anything else. Magic compared to a construction
grade blade.

I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files
(unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation).

Old habits die hard, Ray, but 3d printing changes so fast that it may be
overwritten 6x a day as a design is being fine tuned. But I do consider
the final copy precious. And now that I have a printer that does PETG
consistently. a Prusa MK3S, I can make throw away spares.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable.

On Sunday 12 September 2021 09:12:55 Ray West wrote: > I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of > an item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the > stl file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that > may only be needed once?  Although I tend to keep everything (storage > is cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of > the g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have > changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within > openscad could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated > elsewhere. I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code > is limited, maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file > is pretty long. > All true, but storage is cheap. > However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis > milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and > generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at > least for mechanical type objects, not fine art. rs274d (gcode as used by LinuxCNC) has numerous looping constructs, and I have yet to use a cad program of any kind to write gcode for my 4 cnc'd metal carvers. I do it by hand. The record here I think is probably a saw blade shapening thing to tune up dull carbide table saw blades. About 90 lines, it put 3 days running on Dremels best grinder spinning one of their diamond disks, and made the sharpest blade I've ever used. And likely took under 5 thou from the front face only of a worn out 80 tooth carbide ATBF blade. I put it on my table saw where it cut loads of white ash, cherry, $1500 worth of mahogany, a big pile of butternut, even some 1/8" alu panel and a small ammount of brass before it put the first burn mark on some cherry. Several years use. And I may have to do it again as no one is now making an ATBF blade. If you've ever used one, you'll never look for anything else. Magic compared to a construction grade blade. > I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files > (unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation). Old habits die hard, Ray, but 3d printing changes so fast that it may be overwritten 6x a day as a design is being fine tuned. But I do consider the final copy precious. And now that I have a printer that does PETG consistently. a Prusa MK3S, I can make throw away spares. Cheers, Gene Heskett -- "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author) If we desire respect for the law, we must first make the law respectable. - Louis D. Brandeis Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>
LM
Leonard Martin Struttmann
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 2:21 PM

I also only keep the OpenSCAD files.  And each part is in a separate file.
Vitamin files for motors, sensors, etc., will usually include mounting
screws, holes for those screws, standoffs, etc.  I have a coding standard
for all of my parts that allows me to easily select portions of the part to
preview and to generate cross-sections.

All project parts are collected in a folder/directory, along with
documentation and software for the project.

I always generate new STL and gcode files as needed since I can never trust
myself to remember what version of the part an STL/gcode file represents.

On Sun, Sep 12, 2021 at 8:53 AM Michael Möller private2michael@gmail.com
wrote:

I keep the OpenSCAD file(s) only. If I did something special with the STL
or Gcode, or even some setup on printer, I make a comment in the OpenSCAD
file.

If the project is a few uncomplicated parts they will reside in the same
file needing some commentjuggle to choose which to render&print. That is
also commented in the file.

But I only keep OpenSCAD files. The point of it all is to reduce the
number of files.

(For large project with many parts I do the opposite: One file per part,
common includes and a txt file for the comment, all in a subdir, zipped
when idle/complete)

Michael, fra mobilen

søn. 12. sep. 2021 15.13 skrev Ray West raywest@raywest.com:

I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of an
item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the stl
file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that may
only be needed once?  Although I tend to keep everything (storage is
cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of the
g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have
changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within openscad
could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated elsewhere.
I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code is limited,
maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file is pretty long.

However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis
milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and
generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at
least for mechanical type objects, not fine art.

I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files
(unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation).


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org

I also only keep the OpenSCAD files. And each part is in a separate file. Vitamin files for motors, sensors, etc., will usually include mounting screws, holes for those screws, standoffs, etc. I have a coding standard for all of my parts that allows me to easily select portions of the part to preview and to generate cross-sections. All project parts are collected in a folder/directory, along with documentation and software for the project. I always generate new STL and gcode files as needed since I can never trust myself to remember what version of the part an STL/gcode file represents. On Sun, Sep 12, 2021 at 8:53 AM Michael Möller <private2michael@gmail.com> wrote: > I keep the OpenSCAD file(s) only. If I did something special with the STL > or Gcode, or even some setup on printer, I make a comment in the OpenSCAD > file. > > If the project is a few uncomplicated parts they will reside in the same > file needing some commentjuggle to choose which to render&print. That is > also commented in the file. > > But I only keep OpenSCAD files. The point of it all is to reduce the > number of files. > > (For large project with many parts I do the opposite: One file per part, > common includes and a txt file for the comment, all in a subdir, zipped > when idle/complete) > > Michael, fra mobilen > > søn. 12. sep. 2021 15.13 skrev Ray West <raywest@raywest.com>: > >> I think it is fairly common, that in the evolvement of the design of an >> item to be 3d printed, you will have the final openscad file, the stl >> file, and the g-code file. Do you keep all of them for items that may >> only be needed once? Although I tend to keep everything (storage is >> cheap, finding where is is is expensive) there is little chance of the >> g-code being much use in a year or two, printer/filament will have >> changed. Likewise, the stl file, if generated completely within openscad >> could be disposed of, but not if all or part of it originated elsewhere. >> I think my reasoning is that manual editing printer g-code is limited, >> maybe change temperatures is about the limit, and the file is pretty long. >> >> However, for the multitude of relatively small cnc files (for 3 axis >> milling, sometimes 4) that I have, the g-code is much shorter, and >> generally there is no stl file, and I often edit the raw g-code - at >> least for mechanical type objects, not fine art. >> >> I was just wondering if you bother keeping 3d printing g-code files >> (unless they are possibly in a production manufacturing situation). >> _______________________________________________ >> OpenSCAD mailing list >> To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org >> > _______________________________________________ > OpenSCAD mailing list > To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org >
JB
Jordan Brown
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 10:25 PM

I keep the SCAD files, of course.

I happen to keep the STLs, but that's mostly through not deleting them,
rather than through deliberately keeping them.

Sometimes I keep the slicer project files.  Usually I don't save them.

I keep G-code files through not deleting them, but I also keep them when
I expect to want to make more of the same thing easily - for instance,
every few months I churn out another batch or two of whistles with my
Scout troop's logo on them.

I keep the SCAD files, of course. I happen to keep the STLs, but that's mostly through not deleting them, rather than through deliberately keeping them. Sometimes I keep the slicer project files.  Usually I don't save them. I keep G-code files through not deleting them, but I also keep them when I expect to want to make more of the same thing easily - for instance, every few months I churn out another batch or two of whistles with my Scout troop's logo on them.
NH
nop head
Mon, Sep 13, 2021 5:11 AM

My g-code files are kept by Octoprint on the machine that printed them, so
I can always print them again if I can remember the name or the date.

On Sun, 12 Sept 2021 at 23:25, Jordan Brown openscad@jordan.maileater.net
wrote:

I keep the SCAD files, of course.

I happen to keep the STLs, but that's mostly through not deleting them,
rather than through deliberately keeping them.

Sometimes I keep the slicer project files.  Usually I don't save them.

I keep G-code files through not deleting them, but I also keep them when I
expect to want to make more of the same thing easily - for instance, every
few months I churn out another batch or two of whistles with my Scout
troop's logo on them.


OpenSCAD mailing list
To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org

My g-code files are kept by Octoprint on the machine that printed them, so I can always print them again if I can remember the name or the date. On Sun, 12 Sept 2021 at 23:25, Jordan Brown <openscad@jordan.maileater.net> wrote: > I keep the SCAD files, of course. > > I happen to keep the STLs, but that's mostly through not deleting them, > rather than through deliberately keeping them. > > Sometimes I keep the slicer project files. Usually I don't save them. > > I keep G-code files through not deleting them, but I also keep them when I > expect to want to make more of the same thing easily - for instance, every > few months I churn out another batch or two of whistles with my Scout > troop's logo on them. > > _______________________________________________ > OpenSCAD mailing list > To unsubscribe send an email to discuss-leave@lists.openscad.org >