<div dir="ltr">2016-10-18 17:51 GMT-03:00 doug moen <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:doug@moens.org" target="_blank">doug@moens.org</a>></span>:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">The → symbol is what's used in mathematics to describe functions, eg f : x → x².<br></div></blockquote></div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">I am not really sure, but If I remember correctly the usage of the arrow in math is not exactly that. It describes a property of the function, not the function itself.<br><br>The arrow is used pointing to a SET that contains all possible answers for the function, but does not specify what is the answer for a partigular input. Basically it is equivalent to the return type of a function prototype in C/C++.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">If, for instance, we have a cubic function given by<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">f(x) = x*x*x<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Then f(x) may return any real number, so the result set is all real numbers. <br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">f(x) -> R     (Imagine the stylish R for real numbers here)<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">If f2(x) was a square function, then only positive real numbers could be returned, so...<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">f2(x) -> R+<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">That said, the usage of arrows in openscad or programming languages is up to the developers. :-)<br></div></div>