[OpenSCAD] Joining parts

adrianv avm4 at cornell.edu
Fri Jul 19 20:44:41 EDT 2019


Interesting.  You're right that there are one part epoxies.  I have never
seen that before.  It appears that they work by using temperature to induce
the reaction between the epoxy resin and hardener.  So 3M product 2214 cures
when you apply 248 degrees F.   I haven't yet found a one-part epoxy that
cures at room temperature though.  How would you delay the chemical reaction
until the desired moment?  

The manufacturer of E6000 (Eclectic Products) does not describe it as
"epoxy", just as "adhesive" and the formulation is secret, so it's not clear
how a craft supply company you cite reached the conclusion that the product
is an epoxy.  


DanS wrote
> Yes, just because it is on the internet doesn't mean it is true- but it is
> a LOT better than one random persons opinion.
> 
> Saying it is obviously not epoxy because it is one part composition
> doesn't
> prove anything.  Epoxy is typically two part but it doesn't have to be,
> there are plenty of commercial one part epoxy formulations.
> 
> https://easycrafts.fandom.com/wiki/E6000
> 
> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 5:10 PM adrianv <

> avm4@

> > wrote:
> 
>> Just because you found it somewhere on the internet doesn't make it true.
>>
>> E6000 is obviously not an epoxy because it is a single component product,
>> not a 2 part product like an epoxy that cures through chemical reaction
>> once
>> the parts are mixed.
>>
>> When I googled "What is E6000" I got this:
>>
>> E6000 is an adhesive formulated to meet high performance industrial
>> requirements. It is a non-flammable, vibration proof product that forms a
>> permanent, waterproof bond. E6000 offers extreme flexibility and can be
>> used
>> indoors or out. It is also paintable.
>>
>>
>> DanS wrote
>> > So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the
>> > composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google ("What
>> is
>> > e6000 made of") you get this text:
>> >
>> > "E6000 is an industrial-strength *glue* made from a clear drying,
>> flexible
>> > *epoxy* that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber, vinyl,
>> > leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air
>> > bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."
>> >
>> > On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson <
>>
>> > dbg@
>>
>> > > wrote:
>> >
>> >> E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >>   David Gustavson
>> >>
>>
>> > dbg@
>>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high
>> >> strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so
>> it
>> >> has
>> >> the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.
>> >>
>> >> nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low
>> >> health
>> >> risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably
>> be
>> >> less expensive.
>> >>
>> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson <
>>
>> > hugo@
>>
>> > > wrote:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
>> >> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a
>> >> 59ml
>> >> grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend
>> >> PLA
>> >> parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I
>> >> have
>> >> used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a
>> 24
>> >> hr. cure.
>> >>
>> >> > On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson <
>>
>> > alex@
>>
>> > > wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good
>> contact.
>> >> >
>> >> > For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> >> 'Gorilla
>> >> > glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less
>> brittle
>> >> joint.
>> >> >
>> >> > Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device. 
>> For
>> a
>> >> > really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part,
>> make
>> >> a
>> >> > grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> >> together
>> >> > at those points.
>> >> >
>> >> > You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with
>> the
>> >> holes
>> >> > for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>> >> through
>> >> > them while you do the other welds.
>> >> >
>> >> > This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>> >> exactly
>> >> > the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> >> > https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>> >> >
>> >> > Cheers,
>> >> >
>> >> > Alex Gibson
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > admg consulting
>> >> >
>> >> > edumaker limited
>> >> >
>> >> > . Project management
>> >> > . Operations & Process improvement
>> >> > . 3D Printing
>> >> >
>> >> > -----Original Message-----
>> >> > From: Discuss [mailto:
>>
>> > discuss-bounces at .openscad
>>
>> > ] On Behalf Of
>> >> Bryan
>> >> > Lee
>> >> > Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> >> > To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> >> > Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>> >> >
>> >> > I was just recommended this:
>> >> >       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Thus
>>
>> > arnholm@
>>
>> >  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> >> > +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> >> >> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> >> >>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> >> >> available and superglue fits the bill.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Carsten Arnholm
>> >> >
>> >> > _______________________________________________
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>>
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>> >> >
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>> >> >
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